Conservation

If you live in a conservation area or in a listed building, or in a Georgian, Victorian or Edwardian terraced house, and you want to restore or improve it, then you should choose an architect who has expertise in conservation.

ICE Arch’s principal architect – Alison Taylor-Stokes – is RIBA-trained in Conservation Architecture.

This means that she is conversant with the philosophy and principles of conservation, and familiar with relevant legislation, policies and guidance.

She well-understands the causes and consequences of defects and decay.  She has the skills to undertake surveys and investigations, and to apply appropriate techniques to ameliorate and stabilise existing structures.  This is likely to involve conservation and repair of traditional materials including stone, brickwork, timber and lime products and non-traditional materials including concrete.

At the same time, she will devise a scheme that improves the building’s functionality and comfort, while building-in state-of-the-art services and energy performance.

According to your goals and the building’s context, the scheme might be primarily ‘preservation’, in that usage, regional characteristics, materials and methods are retained. On the other hand, the historic building might be adapted for new use, upgraded or modernised.

These photos show properties where development needs the expertise of a conservation-skilled architect. You may want to download the RIBA guide to find out more.

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